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group study Herbal first aid

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Corvus

Practitioner
Tutor
Here are three plants you can easily grow in your home garden that work well, especially if you live in an area not close to medical treatment - like I do .

Most probably realize the benefits of aloe vera, and its use as a burn treatment . here is something you may not know (all observations I make are in consideration of the ones I made when working in a hospital, including Accident and Emergency ward for about 10 years ) ; if you cut a chunk of aloe vera and remove the skin and secure the 'block' of gel over the burn, not only will it absorb into the area and heal things , as it does , it will also 'disntergrate' leaving a cellulose film over the burn exactly like 'plastic skin' . Dont worry if you cant get it off, it sort of gets incorporated into the skin and will eventually wear off .

Yarrow , known as a healing herb since way back. Alexander the Greats medics carried it to treat sword and ax cuts . Those are not trivial injuries ! I have used it to heal cuts that IMO needed at least 6 stitches in them . Chew the leaves and make a poultice with your spit. Hold the edges of the cut together and place the poultice over it . Carefully bind it so the edges stay together under the poultice . It will not hold the cut together like stitches do, so more care is needed . Do not be alarmed about the 'gangrene color' the next day , thats from the Yarrow :) . After 2 or 3 days it should be healed . A thin scar is the result, not a wide one with stitch hole scares next to it .

The third one ... I need to look up its name ...... (I'll get back on that ) we call it 'stomach weed' , an indigenous remedy , I think it grows elsewhere too . two small leaves are chewed off the top if the plant . Once I was in agony fro recurring kidney stones , I crawled outside naked in the rain (as I could not stand ), nibbled a few leaves and was back in bed asleep in 1/2 an hour . A friend visiting developed such severe cramping from period pain she asked me to take her to hospital . I picked the leaves and she took them in hand and just as she started chewing , was asking me what it was and as we talked she stopped, looked surprised and said " My pain is gone ! "

Keep some growing in your garden - just in case .
 
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Earl Grey

Gonzo Daoist and Dharma Punk
Teacher
Here are three plants you can easily grow in your home garden that work well, especially if you live in an area not close to medical treatment - like I do .

Most probably realize the benefits of aloe vera, and its use as a burn treatment . here is something you may not know (all observations I make are in consideration of the ones I made when working in a hospital, including Accident and Emergency ward for about 10 years ) ; if you cut a chunk of aloe vera and remove the skin and secure the 'block' of gel over the burn, not only will it absorb into the area and heal things , as it does , it will also 'disntergrate' leaving a cellulose film over the burn exactly like 'plastic skin' . Dont worry if you cant get it off, it sort of gets incorporated into the skin and will eventually wear off .

Yarrow , known as a healing herb since way back. Alexander the Greats medics carried it to treat sword and ax cuts . Those are not trivial injuries ! I have used it to heal cuts that IMO needed at least 6 stitches in them . Chew the leaves and make a poultice with your spit. Hold the edges of the cut together and place the poultice over it . Carefully bind it so the edges stay together under the poultice . It will not hold the cut together like stitches do, so more care is needed . Do not be alarmed about the 'gangrene color' the next day , thats from the Yarrow :) . After 2 or 3 days it should be healed . A thin scar is the result, not a wide one with stitch hole scares next to it .

The third one ... I need to look up its name ...... (I'll get back on that ) we call it 'stomach weed' , an indigenous remedy , I think it grows elsewhere too . two small leaves are chewed off the top if the plant . Once I was in agony fro recurring kidney stones , I crawled outside naked in the rain (as I could not stand ), nibbled a few leaves and was back in bed asleep in 1/2 an hour . A friend visiting developed such severe cramping from period pain she asked me to take her to hospital . I picked the leaves and she took them in hand and just as she started chewing , was asking me what it was and as we talked she stopped, looked surprised and said " My pain is gone ! "

Keep some growing in your garden - just in case .

Would you like to add some photos of these herbs so we can see as reference and perhaps some links to sites for people to potentially purchase them to grow? This would be very helpful for other readers!
 
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Corvus

Practitioner
Tutor
Would you like to add some photos of these herbs so we can see as reference and perhaps some links to sites for people to potentially purchase them to grow? This would be very helpful for other readers!

Still trying to track down the name of the third one . I got 'sibatusia' but they didnt know the spelling and I cant find that . Another only knows it by name 'stomach plant ' .

here is aloe

aloe-for-burns.jpg


and here is yarrow

Yarrow.JPG



They are available at nearly all nurseries and garden shops . I snitch my samples off others via cuttings.

As we go on I will post some herbal preparations that are very handy for use in 'agricultural alchemy' ( plant and soil regeneration and health - I used to be a preparations maker for Biodynamic Agriculture Australia ) .
 
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Corvus

Practitioner
Tutor
... and for some reason , the rest of that post disappeared . text , wiki link and more pics .

Oh well, basic info is there .
 
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Zork

Grand Inquisitor
Tutor
Most probably realize the benefits of aloe vera, and its use as a burn treatment . here is something you may not know (all observations I make are in consideration of the ones I made when working in a hospital, including Accident and Emergency ward for about 10 years ) ; if you cut a chunk of aloe vera and remove the skin and secure the 'block' of gel over the burn, not only will it absorb into the area and heal things , as it does , it will also 'disntergrate' leaving a cellulose film over the burn exactly like 'plastic skin' . Dont worry if you cant get it off, it sort of gets incorporated into the skin and will eventually wear off .
I use it at home when the kids get burned. It is also very good to remove bruising.
Yarrow , known as a healing herb since way back. Alexander the Greats medics carried it to treat sword and ax cuts . Those are not trivial injuries ! I have used it to heal cuts that IMO needed at least 6 stitches in them . Chew the leaves and make a poultice with your spit. Hold the edges of the cut together and place the poultice over it . Carefully bind it so the edges stay together under the poultice . It will not hold the cut together like stitches do, so more care is needed . Do not be alarmed about the 'gangrene color' the next day , thats from the Yarrow :) . After 2 or 3 days it should be healed . A thin scar is the result, not a wide one with stitch hole scares next to it .
Where i come from the one with the name "swordweed" is Hypericum perforatum. It has many healing properties.
 
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moment

Practitioner
Tutor

Corvus

Practitioner
Tutor
@Corvus How do you "secure the block of gel" I'm not sure I know what you mean by this but it sounds useful!

Its tricky; thick, slimy and ' shifty ' . Also it depends on the site . One the back of the hand was the first time I did it , Cut the piece big enough to cover all around the burn, trim spiky sides, then slice off the skin. I placed it over the burn, then some cling film (or anything non absorbent as it will absorb into that and not your skin ), then bandaged all around my hand with a 'crepe' bandage (light and elastic ) . Sites like fingers or between fingers more tricky .

Here is another use I tried . I suffered continual ear trouble / infections from constant river swimming / high humidity / dryness cycles . Doc looked in my ears and said the inner skin was mostly scar tissue ( this doesnt allow the correct secretions / 'wax' protection to be produced so ear canals dry out more and 'crack', and that lets infections in easier ) .

I made a 'wick' of gell thicker on one end , thin on the other with a bit of the aloe skin attached for stiffness and to stop it breaking . Then inserted it into my ear canal carefully ( yeah , I know , we are not supposed to put anything in our ears smaller than end of ' little finger ' - so take this not as 'advise' but just something I tried ) . The relief was instant , cool and soothing. I did this when ever I felt irritation. Now I can swim in the river , under water, dive , no ear plugs .... weeeeee !
 
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