Alchemical Garden Forum

Please visit Entering the Garden and discover what are our sustaining roots. You may only apply with us if you agree and consent to our Community Vision and Purpose and Ethos and Ethical Guidelines.

The registration includes writing a letter of application in which you sincerely tell us why you wish to join.

group study Comparative Analysis: Xin Yi or Not Xin Yi

Group study openly invites people to exchange thoughts together based on premises that are always explicitly pointed out, however loose they might be, and when any fixed outcome isn't called for. It's good to keep mindful and respectful of both what is and what isn't relevant for discussion though.

Earl Grey

Gonzo Daoist and Dharma Punk
Teacher
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iBAHRqOtJDQ

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k1SCDPa6M0A

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FQ6Bz25Fr8o


This is a notorious Internet troll who commonly goes by the name ChiDragon. He is an example of why you should never learn only from books, videos, and Internet forums.

The man is a notorious bigot who thinks that nobody without Chinese heritage is allowed to talk about or qualified to practice the internal arts, and most of his learning comes from what he has found on Google and Baidu translations. He insists that his own translation of what is talked about on Chinese forums demonstrates he has more qualifications to discuss the internal arts. Not once does he realize that what is publicly available may not even be in Chinese, let alone contemporary Chinese, as the Daodejing and other old texts were written in Classical Chinese or their alchemical secrets were orally transmitted because the masters were illiterate. Furthermore, he doesn't for one minute consider that there is also misinformation in his Chinese language searches, alongside disinformation because the real secrets are rarely shown so easily.

Even more embarrassing is that he insists that Zhan Zhuang is translated to "standing post" to literally mean standing on actual sticks and balancing. He believes that Zhan Zhuang just means being able to have good balance, without understanding the fascia and core activation, sinking, rooting, or the meditative states that come from Zhan Zhuang.

In his forms, he is like the typical fraud teacher who believes that moving slowly is how to "get Tai Chi", but he lacks martial intent, his body structure looks more like a grandparent who goes on long walks to the market and back rather than an internal artist, let alone a fighter, there is zero relaxation, let alone understanding, and therefore, no skill or power. It is offensive that not only does he consider himself knowledgable, but that other cultivators have recognized him as legitimate, thereby revealing their own mediocrity in self-assessment and their teachers were also likely not too good.


Body structure: F-
Relaxation: F-
Mobility: F-
Understanding: F-
Power: F-
Skill: F-

Final grade: F- - There is no comparison for how low your standards and experience must be to even consider this joke of a student. Avoid at all costs, as even associating with him will waste your time.
 
  • Sympathic joy
Reactions:

Roots of Virtue

At Your Service
Staff member
Moderator
This is a great series for seeing the general difference between traditional practitioners, commercial and modern tough guys, and self-initiated dabblers who have no clue what makes for internal or martial skill.

@Earl Grey I would really like to see more of your examinations on select kungfu practitioners.

Here's my choice list and video links:


Famous or prolific kungfu and qigong book authors

Jonathan Bluestein
Yang Jwing-Ming
Donald Rubbo
Wong Kiew Kit
Roger Jahnke
Shou-Yu Liang
Zhongxian Wu
Tom Bisio
Gerald A. Sharp
Shifu Yan Lei
Neil Ripski
Lam Kam Chuen
Kenneth S. Cohen


Already done reviews:


I'll make my own analysis on professor Cheng Man Ching first, so that I can see how well I'm able to use the same analytic criteria.
 
Last edited:
  • Equanimity
Reactions:

Roots of Virtue

At Your Service
Staff member
Moderator
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=emplAmcmduE


View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3_BKwlpOAkk


Professor Cheng Man Ching was a very famous modern Taijiquan master and scholar who had studied under the legendary Taijiquan master Yang Chengfu.

First of all, it would be a challenge to find any better demonstration of Song, i.e. Neigong relaxation. There is a tangible feeling in every aspect of professor Cheng's Taijiquan that his kungfu fundamentally comes through his impeccable understanding of relaxation, softness, and yielding.

Professor Cheng's mobility and movement is extremely economical to the degree that he seems lazy and not putting any effort. Yet the closer examination tells that everything he does embodies the perfect and natural harmonies of human body, and there is constant smoothness in his even and slow speed. This level of skillful movement wouldn't be possible without perfect rooting skill and postural mechanics. Not even once does he rise his shoulders.

The naturalness and ease in professor Cheng's being indicates superior sensitivity and awareness. Such is not the result of endless drilling hours with external Taijiquan forms, but perfecting Taijiquan's meditative Neigong and allowing receptive intuition to become so spiritually infused that no thought creates distraction or disrupt the heart's tranquil witness. As this type of Taijiquan is not founded in particular martial intent, his overall execution lacks the overt subduing characteristics you would expect in typical kungfu. Despite this, there is certain type of apparent firmness and resoluteness which only a real master would possess.

From Xinyi perspective, the issuing of Fajin is perfect, but one-sided as it lacks the harder characteristics that could shatter the opponent. From Yang Taijiquan perspective, professor Cheng Man Ching harnesses the power of ocean's tidal wave that overwhelms and carries the opponent with its huge momentum.

Body structure: S
Relaxation: SSS
Mobility: S
Understanding: S
Power: A (Xinyi) / S (soft Taijiquan force)
Skill: S

FINAL GRADE: S — You would have to be incredibly lucky to find a Taijiquan master of the same quality.
 
  • Loving-kindness
  • Equanimity
Reactions:

Earl Grey

Gonzo Daoist and Dharma Punk
Teacher
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=emplAmcmduE


View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3_BKwlpOAkk


Professor Cheng Man Ching was a very famous modern Taijiquan master and scholar who had studied under the legendary Taijiquan master Yang Chengfu.

First of all, it would be a challenge to find any better demonstration of Song, i.e. Neigong relaxation. There is a tangible feeling in every aspect of professor Cheng's Taijiquan that his kungfu fundamentally comes through his impeccable understanding of relaxation, softness, and yielding.

Professor Cheng's mobility and movement is extremely economical to the degree that he seems lazy and not putting any effort. Yet the closer examination tells that everything he does embodies the perfect and natural harmonies of human body, and there is constant smoothness in his even and slow speed. This level of skillful movement wouldn't be possible without perfect rooting skill and postural mechanics. Not even once does he rise his shoulders.

The naturalness and ease in professor Cheng's being indicates superior sensitivity and awareness. Such is not the result of endless drilling hours with external Taijiquan forms, but perfecting Taijiquan's meditative Neigong and allowing receptive intuition to become so spiritually infused that no thought creates distraction or disrupt the heart's tranquil witness. As this type of Taijiquan is not founded in particular martial intent, his overall execution lacks the overt subduing characteristics you would expect in typical kungfu. Despite this, there is certain type of apparent firmness and resoluteness which only a real master would possess.

From Xinyi perspective, the issuing of Fajin is perfect, but one-sided as it lacks the harder characteristics that could shatter the opponent. From Yang Taijiquan perspective, professor Cheng Man Ching harnesses the power of ocean's tidal wave that overwhelms and carries the opponent with its huge momentum.

Body structure: S
Relaxation: SSS
Mobility: S
Understanding: S
Power: A (Xinyi) / S (soft Taijiquan force)
Skill: S

FINAL GRADE: S — You would have to be incredibly lucky to find a Taijiquan master of the same quality.

I would also add that he has a lot more power than he demonstrates in the videos because he is showing a lot of restraint in his form. There is a tendency for teachers to not give everything for videos, because someone with a keen eye can take it apart and get more out of the video than they want, and there is also a public display that is different from an inner circle student's private video.

So his power is shown by what he's holding back rather than what he's giving for the video, much like some Filipino Martial Arts students in the United States hide their skills from the police by claiming they're just doing "native dance" instead of practicing how to fight.
 
  • Equanimity
Reactions:

Roots of Virtue

At Your Service
Staff member
Moderator
I would also add that he has a lot more power than he demonstrates in the videos because he is showing a lot of restraint in his form. There is a tendency for teachers to not give everything for videos, because someone with a keen eye can take it apart and get more out of the video than they want, and there is also a public display that is different from an inner circle student's private video.

It's possible, but I can only tell what I see with my amateur confidence. Moreover, I feel that my analysis and grading is hampered by the insufficient definition of ranks S-SSS. My take:

S: Mastery that transcends the stylistic perfections of rank A. Effortlessly integrates and cross-pollinates with other learnt kungfu conventions if these are present.
SS: Generational teacher of masters. The art is so natural that it seems completely lacking any highlights and flashiness.
SSS: Legendary, a wonder for wuxia novels.

As such, I would need to revise my grading for professor Cheng.


Body structure: SS
Relaxation: SSS
Mobility: SS
Understanding: SS
Power: A (Xinyi) / SS (soft Taijiquan force)
Skill: S (Xinyi) / SS (Taijiquan)

FINAL GRADE: SS
 
  • Equanimity
Reactions:

Earl Grey

Gonzo Daoist and Dharma Punk
Teacher
Here now is probably going to be a very controversial analysis of a popular teacher, Damo Mitchell.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LSKZku41Khc


Damo Mitchell's school is one of the most popular and accessible out there for both internal martial arts and alchemy, or neigong. Unfortunately, cutting to the chase, he does not have Xin Yi.

What Damo does have is above average skill within the standards for Xin Yi, which are admittedly almost unfairly high. This skill as he has learned is not wrong. What he teaches isn't totally wrong--a lot of it is fluff that isn't part of typical training. The easy identifying evidence is to look at his students in the inner circle and his students who are part of his open academy: the latter group tends to be very, very fond of him, and Damo is a decent individual, but they treat his teachings as the Ten Commandments.

For the Xin Yi student, Damo has some rooting. The difference in skill between his rooting and the Xin Yi standard is like a birch tree and the redwood trees in the Sequoias. Rooting has both a mind and physiological component, so just having an intellectual understanding of rooting doesn't mean you'll have it until the emotions have settled and the mind is at peace if you are going for rooting via the mind. Likewise, the physical rooting can be done independently of the mind, as we do in our linking practice for Xin Yi. The ideal rooting brings forth both mental and physical practices to properly signal to the body to root, and have the physiological development to be able to respond to the mental signals to do so. Damo has more intellectual understanding than mental relaxation, and has decent, but not Xin Yi level standards of physical rooting.

Damo's physical body is more alchemical, but for the purpose of this analysis, we are not looking at his neigong--which itself is also questionable. It's a mixture of his alchemical practice and decent Tai Chi, so he can relax physically, but it's more mechanical than it is natural. A naturally relaxed master moves and has the same body structure of the above videos of Cheng Man Ching, because he embodies the Tai Chi philosophy to the point that it is inseparable from his natural thinking processes; it's his instinct now. Damo does not have this natural instinct, he has an intellectual understanding that is akin to the theatrical Meisner technique of changing your body language to alter your mind. It works, but according to Xin Yi, the mind changes the body, and the body changes the mind, neither one more influential over the other, so there must be mutual harmony and commands between the two to really relax, move, and sink. For this reason, Damo's power emission is too mechanical, but he can definitely fajin.

While there are better teachers out there, there are many more worse teachers too, and between choosing those like Jake Mace or others analyzed earlier, Damo is a good go-to instructor for the absolute neophyte--he just may not be someone you would follow if you have the good fortune of knowing better options out there.

Body structure: B
Relaxation: B
Mobility: B
Understanding: C
Power: C
Skill: B

Final grade: B - Has decent skill, but it is is marred by his mechanical understanding that isn't totally organic (yet), which appears to be incomplete or heavily redacted to protect inner circle teachings.
 
  • Equanimity
  • Sympathic joy
Reactions:

Roots of Virtue

At Your Service
Staff member
Moderator
Great review @Earl Grey.

Damo has more intellectual understanding than mental relaxation

Yes, this particular statement is going to be a real shocker to many people. Could you please write more about the mental relaxation aspect in Xinyi training?

I have some experience in Xinyi training, and I can say that it's extremely integrating of the mind and body even at the beginner steps. At intermediate levels Xinyi specifically begins the integration of mind and movement through a systematic use of micromovements and experiencing how the physical stress and expressions of power come up in these. The typical easy-going Taiji player will never develop such hard earned integration unless the Taiji flavor is either very martial akin to Xinyi or profoundly yielding and relaxed like professor Cheng Man Ching's. It's one thing to do alchemical sitting meditation and attain tranquility, but the lively mindfulness in movement in all true martial Neigong depends on habituating and immersing the mind into each movement in a visceral manner which can't be hidden or secured under exclusively pleasant conditions... What becomes easily missing is the acceptance of pain and loss, which both are intimately known and conquered by the accomplished spiritual warrior.

If anyone wants Xinyi, he may accomplish it through many ways, but he will have to mindfully embrace all the emotional and physical pain that is blocking the completely immersive body-mind connection. This is how I see it, and if Earl is speaking about some other standard of mental relaxation, then I know nothing about it. Real fighting isn't about exchanging gentlemanly soft bitch slaps and smiling at each others' red cheeks afterwards, but the realistic expectancy is that your opponent is at the very least going to maim you if given the chance. If the soft and dabbling Taijiquan player doesn't actually embody surrender and yielding completely with a fully aware mind that the body can be wrecked and full of pain, then the mind has already become imprisoned to the scare of pain it can't even consciously sense. This is a subtle point that I hope everyone investigates closer: Bringing illuminating awareness into pain and loss brings power because it cuts through ignorance and avoidance!

We can continue the discussion about Taijiquan's nuances in here:



Damo's physical body is more alchemical, but for the purpose of this analysis, we are not looking at his neigong--which itself is also questionable.

As a related matter, one student of Damo Mitchell had mentioned that he teaches using "yin energy", which could probably be characterized as a leftover from his actual alchemical training, to empower the martial Neigong and the gradual transformation of a warrior body. I had doubts about the martial effectiveness of this manner of training for few reasons:

  • Superior mind-body integration as in Xinyi is a different process from the alchemical Neigong. This process spends the same vital energy that could alternatively be invested into alchemical accumulations.
  • There exists a fantastic style called Tao Tan Pai inherited from the legendary Daoist Ancestor Lü Dong Bin. It seamlessly combines both kungfu and alchemical cultivation, which is extremely hard to accomplish. Yet, I haven't heard from any Tao Tan Pai practitioner that this style would be superior to Xinyi or any other kungfu style in all regards. Expert training presents opportunities for learning and growth, but it says nowhere that you can become a great master in everything at once if you merely follow some established routine and a particular set of transmitted and scheduled understanding. (Highest caliber wisdom teachings are another matter, but it's way beyond the technical discussions here.) Therefore, much of learning is about making wise compromises and accepting that we overcome our limitations only few at a time.

All in all, I'm a bit puzzled about the hype around Damo, but reckon much of it is well earned. I haven't heard much criticism of him earlier, only some people saying that his early books aren't particularly good, so I don't know how the "questionable" you had brought up might relate to what I had just written.


The easy identifying evidence is to look at his students in the inner circle and his students who are part of his open academy: the latter group tends to be very, very fond of him, and Damo is a decent individual, but they treat his teachings as the Ten Commandments.

Yikes, if true. Forming dependent relations with the teacher is not a good indicator. Teachers should realize that they might be doing a huge disservice to a lot of people if the students continue eating out of teacher's hand like pets.
 
Last edited:
  • Equanimity
Reactions:

God S

Magus
Tutor
This is a notorious Internet troll who commonly goes by the name ChiDragon.

Have to say he brings entertainment value, almost died laughing when watching those videos, otherwise, it is a good case study of Dunning Kruger syndrome.

All in all, I'm a bit puzzled about the hype around Damo, but reckon much of it is well earned.

I can understand some of it at least, it is a big improvement from the previous famous Dao teacher - Mantak Chia, who got everything wrong. Damo likes to talk and speaks well.
I would be worried though if this is all going into a Cultist mentality and all students I have met online did not leave a positive impression on me, what so ever.

I have some experience in Xinyi training,

I don't know anything about Xinyi or "Taiji Quan" but I can still relate to Earl's words and have an understanding of what "Intellectual level" is.
Like with any Art there exist, books, instructions, lectures. Executing those perfectly is still grasping the Art on a surface level.
To go deeper is to go beyond mind limitations, make an Art part of yourself, and freely express yourself through the Art.
 
  • Equanimity
Reactions:

Earl Grey

Gonzo Daoist and Dharma Punk
Teacher
Yes, this particular statement is going to be a real shocker to many people. Could you please write more about the mental relaxation aspect in Xinyi training?

The mental relaxation aspect as I have learned in my school is not directly taught since it was something that both Masters Greg and JR already had, which comes from doing the training regularly where the physical changes lead to internal transformation, especially the mind. What they realized with me and a few other students with trauma is that just continuing the practice will help a lot, but the real change can't be taught.

What the two of them said was to empty the mind, dissolve my identity, and relax. How to do so, however, was not something they are able to teach since good health is a side effect of good practice, not the focus. Since we develop the mind and intent (the definition of Xin and Yi), we develop the mind and body capable of the martial and almost metaphysical feats, since the ordinary mind and ordinary body can't do that on their own. If someone who has a lot of trauma, like me, develops, a lot of trauma will come up and can be treated as speed bumps on the road forward, though some trauma remains as baggage and requires active mind training beyond the scope of martial practice.

The late Master David was a Buddhist, so he indirectly taught a lot of Daoist and Dharma philosophy tailored to each student's hangups, since he had immense insight that could leave you in tears each time he dressed you down for your impious behavior, and yet inspire you to be better since he spoke in a way that showed he cared and was worried about you not being able to see what you were doing to harm yourself, such as alcohol or sex and gambling habits, the need to fight, arrogance, and so on. He indirectly introduced people to mind training, or lojong in Mahayana tradition. Likewise, Greg and JR can indirectly teach similar principles, but it's not their focus or specialization, they go based off of street wisdom.

If you can't relax your mind naturally, you will have a mechanical Xin Yi that is the difference between the kilobyte of Damo and the terrabyte of David. It's less about control over your emotions and more about not letting your emotions dominate you, as a frenzy in a fight or panic will both lead to harm.

I have some experience in Xinyi training, and I can say that it's extremely integrating of the mind and body even at the beginner steps. At intermediate levels Xinyi specifically begins the integration of mind and movement through a systematic use of micromovements and experiencing how the physical stress and expressions of power come up in these. The typical easy-going Taiji player will never develop such hard earned integration unless the Taiji flavor is either very martial akin to Xinyi or profoundly yielding and relaxed like professor Cheng Man Ching's. It's one thing to do alchemical sitting meditation and attain tranquility, but the lively mindfulness in movement in all true martial Neigong depends on habituating and immersing the mind into each movement in a visceral manner which can't be hidden or secured under exclusively pleasant conditions... What becomes easily missing is the acceptance of pain and loss, which both are intimately known and conquered by the accomplished spiritual warrior.

If anyone wants Xinyi, he may accomplish it through many ways, but he will have to mindfully embrace all the emotional and physical pain that is blocking the completely immersive body-mind connection. This is how I see it, and if Earl is speaking about some other standard of mental relaxation, then I know nothing about it. Real fighting isn't about exchanging gentlemanly soft bitch slaps and smiling at each others' red cheeks afterwards, but the realistic expectancy is that your opponent is at the very least going to maim you if given the chance. If the soft and dabbling Taijiquan player doesn't actually embody surrender and yielding completely with a fully aware mind that the body can be wrecked and full of pain, then the mind has already become imprisoned to the scare of pain it can't even consciously sense. This is a subtle point that I hope everyone investigates closer: Bringing illuminating awareness into pain and loss brings power because it cuts through ignorance and avoidance!

Zhan Zhuang alone helps bring immense changes to the beginner's mind. To the advanced student, this is where you have more insight and a physical brain capable of asserting will over your emotions and thoughts as though you were plucking gray hairs from your head to keep things orderly.

On the surface, the Liuhebafa of Xin Yi looks just like slow movements in Tai Chi or any other Liuhebafa dancer. Upon closer inspection, you'll find there are many things going on with their intent and their mind signaling to the body to do as it says and the body adapting as necessary whether there is a banana peel on the sidewalk or you are atop a mahjong table.

The mental aspect of Xin Yi in martial application is knowing that the moment your opponent has dehumanized you through an insult, a fight is already erupting even without fists being thrown because they aren't playing anymore, they want to destroy you, first verbally to crush you mentally and emotionally, in order to weaken you for the physical assault, leading up to the final verbal taunt. The mind of a Xin Yi student is one who can use verbal push hands to thwart those efforts easily, disrupting their strategy either by more creative insults or casual indifference to someone's immaturity, much like a parent smiles and laughs at a child throwing a tantrum.

Damo spends too much time talking about himself and his system to instill any mental preparation. Most students will end up memorizing his concepts as gospel, and while it's not wrong, there's no room for growth outside of memorizing the way a student prepares for a standardized test like the SATs or LSATs and GREs in the United States.

As a related matter, one student of Damo Mitchell had mentioned that he teaches using "yin energy", which could probably be characterized as a leftover from his actual alchemical training, to empower the martial Neigong and the gradual transformation of a warrior body. I had doubts about the martial effectiveness of this manner of training for few reasons:

  • Superior mind-body integration as in Xinyi is a different process from the alchemical Neigong. This process spends the same vital energy that could alternatively be invested into alchemical accumulations.
  • There exists a fantastic style called Tao Tan Pai inherited from the legendary Daoist Ancestor Lü Dong Bin. It seamlessly combines both kungfu and alchemical cultivation, which is extremely hard to accomplish. Yet, I haven't heard from any Tao Tan Pai practitioner that this style would be superior to Xinyi or any other kungfu style in all regards. Expert training presents opportunities for learning and growth, but it says nowhere that you can become a great master in everything at once if you merely follow some established routine and a particular set of transmitted and scheduled understanding. (Highest caliber wisdom teachings are another matter, but it's way beyond the technical discussions here.) Therefore, much of learning is about making wise compromises and accepting that we overcome our limitations only few at a time.

All in all, I'm a bit puzzled about the hype around Damo, but reckon much of it is well earned. I haven't heard much criticism of him earlier, only some people saying that his early books aren't particularly good, so I don't know how the "questionable" you had brought up might relate to what I had just written.

His alchemical process is theory primarily--and in my opinion, it's a waste of time to get caught up in theory rather than practical experience. Get the experience, then study theory. Focus too much on theory, and you will try to have experiences that match those theories and be impressed at how knowledgable he or other teachers may seem to be. For this reason, his alchemical processes are questionable as far as our framework goes because we would deem it risky. He of course has many satisfied students, so within his framework, it may be plausible, but for what we have tried and tested, it shouldn't take 100 steps in 4 years to achieve what we can do in 2 years for martial and alchemical practice combined in 7 steps or just martial development in 4 steps in the same 2 years.

I don't know anything about Xinyi or "Taiji Quan" but I can still relate to Earl's words and have an understanding of what "Intellectual level" is.
Like with any Art there exist, books, instructions, lectures. Executing those perfectly is still grasping the Art on a surface level.
To go deeper is to go beyond mind limitations, make an Art part of yourself, and freely express yourself through the Art.

Yes, again: focus too much on theory and you get stuck in your head. Qi gets stuck in the head. You don't develop the mind and body or the mind and body harmony to do the necessary things you are hoping to transform and develop through proper practice.

There's a reason that we begin in a technical process like following a recipe for borscht before doing the artistic aspect and making it our own as we add our own interpretation instead of following things to the letter. In the beginning, it's good to follow instructions, but later, you must experiment to discover the art and make your own art.
 
  • Equanimity
Reactions:

Earl Grey

Gonzo Daoist and Dharma Punk
Teacher
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4FxONSgq_I


This analysis of Jiang Rong Qiao is being done because someone claimed that one could learn fajin within 1-3 years and "Fajin whilst walking - super basic work for a Bagua person - you should be able to do this when you have a good grasp of Single Palm Change."

Getting straight to the point: nope, nope, NOPE. The student who introduced this Bagua teacher spends more time talking about his practice than actually field testing it.

This is not even remotely fajin. This is standard Bagua at best.

Going with the description of the student of this line who was more interested in namedropping both individuals and giving fancy names for absolutely basic techniques, there is nothing here that is at Xin Yi standard. It's Bagua. His ability to strike is strong, but this is more li, as in physical strength, not power, or jin.

There is a kind of Bagua taught in China that is like the Tai Chi taught in the parks. There is also a kind of Bagua similar to the Tai Chi taught by so-called "masters" who may do push hands, but can't fight. Then there are the really good masters whose names nobody has heard of, and nobody would ever expect them to have the level of skill they do. There is no way to determine which category Jiang belongs to, though we can safely assume that he has demonstrated respect for the tradition and system, going so far as to study and master Bagua and some Xingyi with Tai Chi. Through this learning history, Jiang himself has good knowledge within those styles, which would net him an A normally--but we are grading his understanding of power and Xin Yi as a skill, not his mastery of Xingyi, Tai Chi, or Bagua.

Please remember that his analysis does not denigrate his Bagua or his understanding of Tai Chi and Xingyi, but how close he is to Xin Yi having studied multiple styles that use different facets of internal arts that lack some of the components for power.

Body structure: C
Relaxation: C
Mobility: A
Understanding: B
Power: D
Skill: B

Final grade: B - Has decent skill within his own style, but it is not comparable to Xin Yi, especially as it lacks rooting, relaxation, and power.

UPDATE: I am adding a video below of a self-proclaimed student who says he is part of Jiang's lineage. He did not outright say he studied with Jiang, and it's strongly implied that he learned from a student of Jiang and from a DVD. This student will not get graded and merely serve as an example of self-assessment and lack of both technical knowledge and experience with the real thing leading to the result in the video.


View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3v5bj7nklzY
 
Last edited:
  • Equanimity
Reactions:
Top